Capitolism

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Posts Tagged ‘Ryan Berg

Obama: The Foreign Policy President? Part 2

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By Guest Blogger Ryan Berg

In my last post, I examined Obama’s potentially crippling defeat in the midterm elections.  I suggested that one way presidents typically deal with domestic problems is to turn to foreign affairs, where their latitude for unilateral action is far greater.  I also suggested that Obama, unlike Clinton and more like Reagan, faces an international environment that offers him plenty of room for decisive action.  Let us examine these windows of possible action, weighing their costs and benefits from a political standpoint. Read the rest of this entry »

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Written by ryancberg

November 12, 2010 at 3:52 pm

Obama: The Foreign Policy President? Part 1

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By Guest Blogger Ryan Berg

In last week’s midterm elections, Republicans made significant inroads in the House and Senate, governorships, and state legislatures across the country.  In the words of the President himself, he received a “shellacking.”  Whether voters delivered President Obama an ideological repudiation or gave Republicans a wide-sweeping “legislative mandate” is not my interest; rather, I am interested in what Obama can do moving forward, with an outlook to his prospects in the 2012 presidential election. Read the rest of this entry »

A Philosopher President?

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By Guest Blogger Ryan Berg

Harvard historian and prominent intellectual James T. Kloppenberg spent the last two years of his research reading an impressive corpus of literature on President Obama.  Kloppenberg poured through Obama’s books; his essays; his speeches; every article published in the Harvard Law Review during Obama’s three years there; and even interviewed his former professors.  What is Kloppenberg’s theory after all his research? He posits Obama “is a true intellectual—a word that is frequently considered an epithet among populists with a robust suspicion of Ivy League elites.” Read the rest of this entry »

Cicero Contra Intellectual Decline in Retirement

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From Guest Blogger Ryan Berg

For some successful business people, retirement is a word that connotes positive meanings.  “Retirement could not come sooner,” or “I want to sell my business and retire at 55 or 60,” I have heard on many occasions.  Some cannot wait for the moment of physical leisure to take over, but is it at the expense of our mental leisure? A recent study published in the Journal of Economic Perspectives notes what many have suspected for a long time, yet has remained remarkably difficult to prove: memory declines with age, diminishing our ability to think and reason critically and rigorously. Those who retire early perform worse on cognitive tests, especially memory tests. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Russell S.

October 14, 2010 at 12:16 am

Recruitment Trends and the Liberal Arts

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By Guest Blogger Ryan Berg

In light of my recent post about Leo Strauss, an education in political philosophy, and the liberal arts, I found a recent article in the Wall Street Journal about recruitment trends at America’s top colleges quite disconcerting.  Companies recruiting new hires have recently moved the preponderance of their recruitment efforts to state universities.  Recruiter’s top five favorite universities are all public, and the list is comprised mostly of top public universities.

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Written by Russell S.

October 11, 2010 at 8:54 pm

Education Costs: Higher and Higher

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From Guest Blogger Ryan Berg

Higher education costs have come to vastly outpace our ability to pay themt.  This is no secret.  Ask most students, and especially parents who help foot the bill.  President Obama stated recently his goal for fifty percent of Americans to obtain some form of higher education—up from its current level of about twenty-five percent—a lofty goal, indeed.  However, like all political endeavors, his efforts will be stymied without figuring out some cost control measures for both public and private school tuition alike. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Russell S.

September 15, 2010 at 11:07 am

Monetarists: Alive and Kicking

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By Guest Blogger Ryan Berg

In a recent article, Caroline Baum laments the death of “monetarists,” the economic movement inspired by Nobel-prize-winning economist, Milton Friedman.  However, the recent economic downturn proves that Friedman’s ideas remain relevant. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Russell S.

September 8, 2010 at 1:21 am